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Search and Seizure: What You Should Know if You Want to Become a Police Officer

2019-04-24 by NAHB

police foundations program

Section 8 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms states that “Everyone has the right to be secure against unreasonable search or seizure.” This is a fundamental legal right that protects Canadians from intrusive and unreasonable searches. If police violate this right in order to obtain evidence, it often means that that evidence is inadmissible in court.

If you want to pursue training to eventually become a police officer or work in a related profession after your police foundations course, then you will need to have an understanding of Canada’s search and seizure laws. Here’s a brief look at what search and seizure laws are and what they could mean for your career.

Students in Police Foundations Courses Know That Warrants Are Often Required

While the Charter prohibits “unreasonable search and seizure,” it does not clarify what “unreasonable” means. Instead, that has been left up to the courts to decide. Generally, it has been interpreted to mean that police officers need to obtain a warrant before they can search or seize a person’s property, or else they need the property owner’s consent to perform a search. You’ll learn more about search warrants, the Charter, and how they could affect your career in your police foundations program.

For police to search private property, they usually need to obtain a search warrant beforehand

For police to search private property, they usually need to obtain a search warrant beforehand

There are exceptions, however, where police can search property without a warrant or consent. For example, police can enter a home in order to prevent someone from being seriously injured or killed. Likewise, if police have reason to believe that evidence relating to a serious offence might be lost or destroyed during the time it takes to obtain a warrant, they can also conduct a search without a warrant.

Search and Seizure Laws Also Apply to Other Security-Related Professionals

Search and seizure laws don’t just affect police officers. By studying police foundations courses, you may also choose to pursue other professions, such as being a security guard or customs officer. Search and seizure laws apply differently to security guards and customs officers than they do to police officers. For one, security guards are private citizens, whereas police officers are agents of the state. As such, security guards do not have the right to search and seize a person’s private property nor can they obtain a warrant to do so. Only police can obtain a search warrant.

However, there are times when security guards may be able to perform searches. For example, a bag search may be required for anybody who wants to gain entrance to an event. Since the event is being held on private property, security guards employed by the property owner have the right to search entrants’ bags as a condition of entry. While people can refuse to have their bags searched, that also gives security guards the right to refuse them entry.

Customs officers, on the other hand, have much broader search powers than police typically do. This is because the Supreme Court has ruled that individuals have a lower reasonable expectation of privacy at border crossings than in other situations. For example, customs officers can typically search a person’s vehicle, luggage, and electronic devices without a warrant when they are crossing the border. Unlike police officers, customs officers do not need reasonable and probable grounds to conduct a search.

Customs officers have much broader search powers than police officers do

Customs officers have much broader search powers than police officers do

Do you want to become a police officer?

Contact the National Academy of Health and Business to learn about our programs.

Why Learning Proper Stress Management Is Important in a Police Foundations Program

2019-03-27 by NAHB

become a police officer

Whether you want to become a police officer, security guard, court officer, or private investigator, a career in a security-related profession can be incredibly rewarding and exciting. Many of these careers, however, can also lead to stressful encounters and situations, given the nature of the work involved. This means that if you’re considering pursuing a security-related career path, it’s good to take stress management seriously.

Stress management is an important part of police foundations training. By understanding how to manage stress, you not only improve your own health, but you can also boost your job performance and help further ensure the safety of others.

Read on to find out how stress management can help you prepare for your career after police foundations training.

Police Foundations Training Can Prepare You for the Stressors of Risk Assessment

Security-related professionals tend to feel a high amount of stress because they are so often actively watching for potential risks. A customs officer, for example, will be on the lookout for people trying to cross the border with illegal goods like firearms and drugs, while a court officer would constantly be on guard for anybody who may pose a threat to the court. Police officers, meanwhile, are responsible for ensuring the safety of themselves and the public and community at large.

Staying on the lookout for potential risks is an important part of a career in security

Staying on the lookout for potential risks is an important part of a career in security

This heightened sense of risk assessment means that you will constantly be on alert in a security-related profession, and this can, of course, be stressful. Fortunately, the stress management techniques covered in a police foundations program can help you manage different situations with calm and composure.

Stress Management Can Help You Adjust to Shift Work When You Become a Police Officer

A career in security, including the police, often involves working shifts; indeed, many people are attracted to this line of work precisely because it isn’t a typical 9 to 5 job. Working irregular hours such as night shifts and weekends, however, can bring its own particular challenges and stressors.

Shift work, for instance, is more likely to lead to fatigue and dietary problems due to factors such as irregular eating schedules or sleep habits, and it can also disrupt the amount of quality time you spend with family and loved ones, who are more likely to be on a typical schedule and thus only available for certain windows of time.

These factors can lead to stress both on and off the job, but stress management techniques help provide the proper resources you need to better overcome these challenges. Your police foundations training, for example, includes lessons on nutrition and lifestyle management, which can help ensure you are eating healthy and scheduling quality time with loved ones. Additionally, your training will look at the stress and lifestyle challenges that security-related professionals often face in order to best prepare you with the knowledge you need to tackle them if they arise in your own career.

Are you interested in learning how you can prepare to become a police officer?

Contact NAHB to find out more about our law enforcement programs.

How a Police Foundations Program Can Help Prepare You for a Career as a Court Officer

2019-02-27 by NAHB

police foundations program

Police foundations training can open up many doors, and help prepare you to pursue several different career paths. If you’re considering enrolling in a police foundations program, for example, you may be interested in pursuing a career as a private investigator or customs and immigration officer. You could even be thinking of becoming a court officer after graduation. Court officers do a lot more than saying “Please rise!” when the judge enters the courtroom. They maintain order and security in the court and assist the judge, jury, and lawyers in carrying out their duties.

Being a court officer can be an exciting career to pursue after police foundations training. Read on to find out how your training in a police foundations course can help prepare you for this rewarding career path.

Court Officers Have Many Different Responsibilities and Duties

A career as a court officer includes many different duties and responsibilities. For example, court officers can sometimes be required to hand documents to and between the judge, jury, and attorneys, or get signatures for various documents.

Court officers may be required to get signatures for various documents

Court officers may be required to get signatures for various documents

If you want to become more familiar with some of the subjects you may see in a career as a court officer, a police foundations program can introduce you to documents such as warrants, statements, and confessions. Knowing the fundamentals of the laws of evidence can help you better understand the legal system as a whole, including what type of evidence is considered legally admissible, what disclosure obligations entail, and how to understand oral evidence provided by witnesses—all of which you can learn about in police foundations courses.

Court Officers Can Use Their Training to Ensure Courtroom Safety

While court officers have many duties and responsibilities, their primary concern is ensuring courtroom safety. Emotions can run high in some cases where defendants and plaintiffs have a lot riding on the outcome. Furthermore, they may have friends, family, and supporters in the gallery who are heavily invested in the trial rulings. With emotions high, it is up to the court officer to keep the peace and make sure everybody remains calm.

Likewise, the court officer must ensure the safety of the judge, which can include escorting them between the courtroom and their office. Some cases can attract a lot of media attention and during these cases the court officer must also make sure journalists and reporters are abiding by the court rules and respecting any instructions given by the judge.

Courtroom safety is an important responsibility of court officers

Courtroom safety is an important responsibility of court officers

By covering such topics as dealing with aggression, conflict management and resolution, a police diploma program can prepare aspiring court officers for the safety aspects of their occupation. Having these skills can help prepare you to address and manage safety issues that may arise in the courtroom, as well as resolve them safely and effectively. For instance, the court officer has to carry out the judge’s orders, which may include asking people who are being disruptive to leave the courtroom. Because somebody who is being disruptive may also be acting aggressively, learning about dealing with aggression in your training can help you carry out these responsibilities effectively.

Would you like to become a police officer or court officer?

Contact the National Academy of Health and Business to learn more about our programs!

Here Are the 5 Most Important Qualities You’ll Need to Become a Police Officer

2018-12-19 by NAHB

become a police officer

Police officers perform a very wide range of duties, including patrolling neighbourhoods, interviewing suspects, and mediating conflicts. Because of this variety and unpredictability, and also because of the high level of trust placed in police officers, there are certain personal qualities that are very important for anyone hoping to enter a career in law enforcement.

If you’re considering becoming a police officer, you may have wondered what personal qualities you’ll need to succeed in this exciting and fulfilling career. Here are five of the most important.

1. Police Officers Need to Be Empathetic and Compassionate

Police officers spend every day working with the public, often in unusually difficult and stressful circumstances. They also spend a good deal of time working with vulnerable populations, including those with addiction and mental health issues. For these reasons and many others, compassion and empathy are essential qualities for police officers. This means the ability to understand what someone else is feeling in a given situation, to share those feelings, and to act on them appropriately in order to offer the assistance they need. By engaging with the public with empathy and compassion, police officers are often able to de-escalate heated situations, to help victims in times of distress, and to build a rapport with the communities they serve.

2. Police Officers Should Be Team Players

Being a police officer involves frequent coordination with other law enforcement officers and departments, as well as court officials, paramedics, social workers, and more. Whether following orders, taking on a leadership role, or coordinating among several officers or departments, police work is highly cooperative, so those hoping for a job in law enforcement should be good team players.

Police regularly work with other first responders like fire fighters and paramedics

Police regularly work with other first responders like fire fighters and paramedics

3. Critical Thinking Is Essential for Careers in Law Enforcement

Police officers deal with an incredibly varied range of situations in their work. To understand what’s happened or happening in these situations, police officers are often required to sort through a large amount of information, including statements and evidence that can be potentially irrelevant, misleading, or contradictory. In order to sort through this information effectively and arrive at the truth, police officers need to combine the skills they learn in their police foundations courses with excellent critical thinking skills, and they need to be able to employ them even in fast-paced or high-stress situations.

4. Adaptability and Flexibility Are Important When You Become a Police Officer

When you become a police officer, you can expect to work in ever-changing conditions. From the laws you’re enforcing, to the guidance you receive in how best to enforce those laws, to the problems and the people you encounter on the streets, as a police officer you’ll deal with a variety of shifting factors and need to be flexible and adaptable in order to stay current with those changes.

5. Integrity Is a Fundamental Quality for Police Officers

Public trust is essential for police officers to do their work. The public needs to have a high level of trust in police officers in order to feel comfortable, safe, and confident when reporting crimes, allowing police into their homes, or revealing private or sensitive information in the course of an investigation. In order to cultivate and maintain this trust, integrity is a fundamental quality for all police officers. Integrity means following through and performing your duties to the best of your abilities, honestly and thoroughly, even when you’re not being monitored or rewarded.

Integrity is an essential quality for police officers who depend on public trust

Integrity is an essential quality for police officers who depend on public trust

Are you considering a career in law enforcement?

Contact the National Academy of Health and Business for more information about our police foundations program.

[Infographic] Essential Study Tips for Working Parents

2018-12-04 by NAHB

Going back to school is never easy – even when it’s to secure the training needed to change careers or land a dream job. Many students have plenty of important responsibilities that can’t easily be put on pause during their studies. A full- or part-time job, friends, and family commitments can all take up precious time. For working parents especially, striking a solid work/study/life balance can be hard.

Fortunately, it’s not all bad news. Many colleges know just how important other commitments can be, and work hard to offer courses at convenient times as well as plenty of support to students. In addition, there are plenty of great tips and tricks that you can use to ease the transition back to school. Whether you want to complete business courses to secure a lucrative promotion, achieve your dream by enrolling in a police foundations program, or give back to your community by taking on a career in healthcare, you can reach your goals.

Here are some of the study tips you can use to make the most of your time, and obtain the training you’ve always wanted.

business courses

Essential Study Tips for Working Parents

Going back to school can be a big time commitment.

For working parents, it can be difficult to make time for studies, and use study time effectively.

Here are some tips to help you free up time, stay refreshed, and remember coursework!

Planning Ahead Can Be a Big Help

• Write up a schedule or calendar
• Make sure to mark down important deadlines
• Include important family events you don’t want to miss
• Allocate time for studying
• Make sure to include plenty of “me time” as well!

Pro tip: Show your schedule to your kids and partner. This will help them know when you might need to study more in preparation for a big test or assignment.

Use Time-Saving Tricks Around the House

• Pay bills and purchase groceries online
• Automate payments where possible
• Make meals ahead of time and freeze them for later use
• Use different laundry baskets to pre-sort clothes

Did you know? On average, people spend an hour on housework every day!

Make Study Time a Family Activity

• Establish ground rules, such as staying quiet
• Encourage your kids to ask for help only after study time is over
• Make sure that the study space is free of distractions
• Give yourself and your children a reward after studying!
• Studying with your children sets a great example

Use Study Time Effectively

• Study on public transit and during short breaks in your day
• Dedicate a quiet place at home to studying
• Write notes by hand to remember them better
• Read material out loud to help recall lessons easily
• Quiz yourself to check your progress
• Colour code notes to make them easier to remember

Pro tip: Switching between several topics in one study session can help boost your problem-solving skills!

Make Use of Your Support Network

• Talk to your partner about dividing responsibilities
• Ask kids to complete small chores
• Start a study group with classmates
• Ask teachers for help if you don’t understand material

Don’t Forget to Make Time for Yourself!

• Be sure to eat a complete breakfast
• Get plenty of sleep to feel refreshed
• Make time for activities you enjoy
• Reward yourself and celebrate achievements!

Sources:
https://www.mother.ly/parenting/how-to-delegate-chores-and-actually-get-your-kids-to-do-them
https://www.ici.net.au/blog/7-practical-strategies-for-balancing-parenting-and-study/
http://www.essentialbaby.com.au/life-style/family-home/tips-for-studying-while-raising-young-kids-20150109-3nt5h
https://www.workingmother.com/practical-tips-for-moms-balancing-kids-studies-and-work#page-2
https://www.wikihow.com/Study-when-You-Have-Children
https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/244230
https://experthometips.com/45-time-saving-hacks-for-a-more-relaxed-you
https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/pub/11-008-x/2011002/t/11520/tbl004-eng.htm
https://greatist.com/happiness/better-study-tips-test

Identity Theft and Identity Fraud: The Key Differences Explained for Students in Police Foundations Programs

2018-10-31 by NAHB

police career

According to many experts, identity theft and identity fraud are on the rise. According to NBC, “In 2012, some 17,094 Canadians were victims of identity theft. In 2014, that number jumped to 20,611, an increase of nearly 20% in 2 years”.

In addition, according to a recent survey, “86% of Canadians believe they are increasingly at risk of identity theft and identity fraud.” For aspiring law enforcement professionals, these figures present a troubling problem. However, before trying to uncover different solutions, it’s first important to have a thorough understanding of these two terms, as well as how they differ from each other. Read on for a quick explainer.

Meet Roger Clowater: Police Foundations Training Instructor at NAHB

2018-09-19 by NAHB

police foundations program

A career in public service requires dedication, compassion, and a strong sense of principles. For Roger Clowater, his lifelong career in law enforcement inspired him to prepare the next generation of students looking to make a difference. Thanks to his dedication and commitment, many of his students have earned their Certificate of Results and gone on to protect and serve in a variety of fulfilling careers.

Read on to learn more about Roger’s career and how he goes above and beyond for his students.

The Key Differences Between Criminal and Civil Law: An Intro for Those in Police Foundations Programs

2018-09-12 by NAHB

police foundations program

Between 2016 and 2017, the Crime Severity Index (CSI) in Canada reported over 1.9 million police-reported criminal code incidents. For police officers working on the frontlines of law enforcement, having a keen understanding of criminal law is essential. In addition, under certain circumstances they may be called upon as a witness during civil cases. Developing an in-depth understanding of both is therefore an essential part of training for this career path.

Here is a quick guide to some of the differences between civil and criminal litigation for students interested in beginning a career in law enforcement.

An Overview of Criminal Law for Students in Police Foundations Training

In Canada, once a Crown prosecutor decides to bring charges against someone who has allegedly committed a criminal offence, this person then becomes the defendant, and their case is brought to trial. The prosecutor represents the community at large and acts as a public employee who is provided to the victim by the Crown counsel’s budget.

Criminal law involves a Crown-appointed prosecutor and a high burden of proof

Criminal law involves a Crown-appointed prosecutor and a high burden of proof

Additionally, during trial the defendant’s guilt must be proven beyond a reasonable doubt, meaning that the judge or jury must be convinced that there is a high probability that the accused in fact committed the crime. As students in a police foundations program know, criminal law addresses offences which were committed with intentional harm against an individual and the community at large. For instance, a home invasion is considered a criminal offence because although it involves property, it violates the privacy and safety of the home’s occupants as well as the community’s notion of the home as a safe space. In order for a defendant to be convicted of a crime, it must be proven based upon the evidence presented that it was committed intentionally. It is important to remember that in Canada, the defendant should be considered innocent until a guilty verdict has been determined.

A Quick Overview of Civil Law

Civil law, in contrast to criminal litigation, concerns a dispute between private parties. In addition, the defendant may be held responsible for damages or injury which occurs as a result of their negligence. A majority of civil law presented to the court includes family law, which involves divorce, child custody, as well as spousal and child support. Allegations of medical malpractice, distribution of estate, and employment complaints are also covered in civil court. Students in police foundations training should be aware that they can be called a witness in a civil trial if they serve a subpoena to anyone involved or acted within the dispute in a law enforcement capacity.

If a case is found to have merit, the court may order the losing party to pay for sufficient damages, which usually involves financial compensation. Other means of resolving a civil case, known as a remedy, are through a declaration which states the rights of the parties, and an injunction, which is a restraining order that states a party has or does not have the ability to take a certain action.

What Are the Main Differences?

Generally, the main difference between civil law and criminal law is that to find the accused at fault, more evidence is required in criminal cases than civil ones. To prove that a crime was committed beyond a reasonable doubt, the prosecution must also demonstrate that the act was committed with intent. Civil cases, however, must be proven on what’s known as a balance of probabilities, which indicates if it is more probable than not that the defendant can be held liable for causing harm or loss to the plaintiff. There is a lower standard of proof involved because a civil trial does not use incarceration or jail time as punishment, but instead settles disputes financially.

Standards of liability and punishment differ between criminal and civil court

Standards of liability and punishment differ between criminal and civil court

Would you like to become a police officer?

Contact the National Academy of Health and Business for more information.

3 Things to Know About Young Offenders if You Want to Become a Police Officer

2018-08-15 by NAHB

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When considering how to contend with young offenders in Canada, the criminal justice system focuses on protecting communities while simultaneously favouring rehabilitation and reintegration over incarceration. The Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA) outlines all the rights that young offenders would be entitled to in court. Sentencing and other aspects of law enforcement are also covered by the act, which places emphasis on more lenient sentences, such as community service or volunteering, for non-violent crimes.

When coming face to face with a young offender as a police officer, there are many important points to consider. Keep reading to learn more about what law enforcement keeps in mind when working with youth.

1. Young Offenders Are Not as Mature as Adults

There is a reason that the YCJA doesn’t treat adolescents aged 12 to 17 the same way as an adult. Youths lack the maturity of an adult, and may commit crimes for reasons such as peer pressure or bullying. In fact, on a physiological level, teenage brains are different from those of adults. As young teens enter puberty, their brains undergo dramatic changes that begin in areas like the limbic system and other emotional centres. The prefrontal cortex, which is responsible for complex decision-making and planning ahead, is the last part of the brain to undergo this development. This means that emotional regulation is often more difficult for teenagers than it is for adults.

2. Young Offenders May Come from Troubled Homes

Young offenders, particularly those dealing with family violence or abuse, might be at greater risk of committing crimes than peers with a larger support network. For troubled youths, shoplifting or other non-violent crimes may be a non-healthy coping mechanism they use as they navigate a difficult time.

This is one of the reasons why the Youth Criminal Justice Act places such a strong emphasis on rehabilitation. Many pilot programs have also explored alternatives to punishment through counselling, volunteering, or other approaches that aim to help young offenders understand the consequences of their actions and avoid becoming repeat offenders. After your police foundations training, you may come across such programs as you work with your community.

3. The Consequences for Young Offenders Can Be Severe

For young offenders, sentences are less severe than they are for adults. However, this is not to say that the consequences of their actions won’t have a profound impact on their lives. To start with, young offenders may not be allowed to travel to certain countries. In addition, some universities may also refuse acceptance on the grounds of an offense committed.

In addition, while clemency is often emphasized, graduates of a police foundations program know that the safety of the community is also an important aspect the Youth Criminal Justice Act considers. Particularly violent crimes or repeat offenses that keep escalating in nature may present too great a risk, and so judges may decide that a prison sentence is most appropriate. In extreme cases, judges may even consider trying a youth as an adult.

While these aspects of law enforcement can often be emotionally challenging, working in this field offers the potential to truly make a difference in the lives of troubled teens and their communities.

Are you ready help youths after you become a police officer in Ontario?

Contact the National Academy of Health and Business for more details!

Careers You Can Pursue After Police School: What Qualities Make for a Good Immigration Officer?

2018-05-30 by NAHB

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Becoming an immigration officer is ideal for graduates who enjoy working with people, and who want a career that truly makes a difference. However, it’s important to note that being an immigration officer takes commitment and integrity, and comes with its own unique set of challenges. With the right training and attitude, though, it can be a very rewarding option.

Are you curious to learn more about the qualities and characteristics that make law enforcement professionals a good fit for this career? Read on to find out more!

The Best Immigration Officers Are Organized and Detail Oriented

To have what it takes to be a great immigration officer, future candidates must be coordinated and highly organized individuals. A career as an immigration officer is a busy one, whether working in an airport or at a land border. As such, immigration officers benefit from being organized and from maintaining a neat workspace, in order to deal with such a high volume of arrivals.

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Since 2015, over 27,554,943 foreign residents have visited Canada. That’s a lot!

Apart from examining passports and conducting surveillance, immigration officers may also be tasked with interviewing non-Canadian citizens, asking questions, and taking fingerprints. As such, they will need to be effective multitaskers in order to balance their various responsibilities and avoid making errors. Graduates of police school looking to pursue careers as immigration officers will also need to pay close attention to passport details in order to ensure that they’re properly enforcing Canada’s immigration legislation.

Great Immigration Officers Have Excellent Communication and Interpersonal Skills

Another important quality that makes a great immigration officer is the ability to communicate clearly and professionally. For those interested in linguistics, learning a second language could also help them better communicate with visitors and non-Canadian citizens who may not be fluent English speakers.

Although being an immigration officer is a serious job, it is important to stay friendly and cordial with non-Canadian citizens crossing the border. Thankfully, top programs like the police foundations program at the National Academy of Health and Business (NAHB) help graduates develop a thorough understanding of interpersonal relationships within the context of law enforcement occupations. As a result, graduates enter their careers ready to communicate both politely and professionally.

Graduates of Police School Who Exercise Good Judgment Make Great Immigration Officers

While good immigration officers must exercise constant vigilance in order to successfully mitigate security risks, good judgement also means not being too rash to profile migrants. Immigration officers must always remember that foreign travellers deserve to be treated with respect and dignity.

Social perceptiveness means having the ability to read subtle cues in someone’s body language. For immigration officers, this ability may be useful for picking out suspicious behaviour. However, experienced immigration officers also know that some behaviours can mean very different things. For example, a lack of eye contact can be interpreted as a sign of insincerity, but it can also be a sign of nervousness or shyness. Some non-Canadian citizens arriving in airports may be nervous flyers and feel shaken up from their flight, or feel nervous around law enforcement officials. Therefore, their hesitation when answering questions may simply be a manifestation of these feelings, rather than signs of suspicious behaviour. Telling these behaviours apart can be tricky, which is why one of the greatest signs of an excellent immigration officer is the ability to exercise sound judgement and avoid jumping to quick conclusions.

Are you ready to become a police officer or immigration officer?

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