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4 Exercise Ideas to Help Keep Seniors Active after Your PSW Courses

2019-04-17 by NAHB

personal support worker trainingPersonal support workers play an important role in helping elderly clients stay healthy and happy. Regular physical activity and light exercise can have many positive effects on seniors’ physical and mental health as they grow older, including encouraging sociability, enhancing mood, and improving aspects such as circulation, strength, and mobility.

From dancing to tai chi, there are a variety of creative ways to get clients physically active. If you’re interested in becoming a personal support worker, here are four exercise ideas you can use to help keep seniors active after completing your courses and beginning your career as a personal support worker!

1. Take Senior Clients Outdoors for Some Fresh Air and New Surroundings

Going for a walk or short hike can be a great way to keep older clients moving. Walking has been shown to provide a number of benefits to seniors, including improving circulation, boosting memory, and enhancing mood. It’s also a great opportunity for seniors to socialize, experience nature, and get some fresh air and new scenery along the way.

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Walking and hiking outdoors are great simple exercises for seniors

2. Get Seniors to Break Out Their Best Dance Moves When You Become a PSW

Another fun and social way to get seniors moving is through dancing. Organizing dances with residents at a care facility can be a great way to give clients something to look forward to and participate in, while also getting in some good cardiovascular exercise. After completing your personal support worker training, consider setting up a regular “dance night” for senior clients where they can request their favourite songs. You can even hire a live band to provide a festive atmosphere that gets seniors out of their seats and onto the dance floor.

3. Wii Games Can Help Seniors Stay Active During the Winter Months

Wii games can be a great way to keep seniors active when you become a PSW, particularly during the winter months when outdoor activities might not be an option. Unlike other video game consoles, the Wii uses handheld remotes which are moved by the player in order to control the action on-screen, which can include physical activities such as swinging virtual tennis rackets and golf clubs. Wii consoles are easy to set up, and a wide range of games are available to cater to any resident’s interests and tastes, including tennis, golf, fishing, baseball, and bowling, among many others.

4. Tai Chi Offers a Range of Health Benefits to Senior Clients

Tai chi is an ancient Chinese tradition often practised today as a form of exercise. It involves performing a series of movements in a slow and steady manner, with a focus on breathing. Tai chi puts minimal stress on joints and muscles, and is generally low-impact and easy to learn, making it a great exercise option for seniors. It also offers a number of benefits, especially for elderly clients, including improving balance and strength, as well as potential mental benefits such as a reduced risk of depression and improvements in cognitive function and memory.

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Tai chi is another great way to keep seniors active when you become a PSW

Are you interested in pursuing a career as a personal support worker?

Contact the National Academy of Health and Business to learn more about our PSW courses!

3 Ways You Can Use Your Interpersonal Skills in a PSW Career

2019-03-06 by NAHB

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Interpersonal skills refer to any skill that makes interaction and communication between yourself and others easier and more open. Given that personal support workers (PSW) spend so much time caring for and interacting with clients, interpersonal skills are an essential part of their work. While many people have the mistaken belief that such skills are innate, the truth is that they can be taught and developed over time.

In fact, an important part of PSW training is developing interpersonal skills. As a PSW, you’ll use the skills learned during training extensively while on the job. Here are just three ways you’ll put your interpersonal skills to use if you pursue a career as a PSW.

Talking with Clients Is an Important Part of Your PSW Career

PSWs help with many practical activities such as personal hygiene, meal preparation, and housekeeping. What you may not realize, however, is that a key part of a PSW’s job is simply talking to clients. Some clients may feel socially isolated because of their health condition, especially if it prevents them from leaving their home very often. Being able to provide conversation helps decrease this feeling of isolation and can improve their overall mental health.

By talking with clients, PSWs help them feel less socially isolated

By talking with clients, PSWs help them feel less socially isolated

Your interpersonal skills help facilitate this social aspect of your career. For example, by maintaining a positive and friendly demeanour, you can help your clients feel cared for and safe opening up to you. Likewise, showing empathy through both verbal and nonverbal communication will help clients know they can trust you and talk freely with you.

Active Listening Helps PSWs Identify the Individual Needs of Clients

Active listening is a key interpersonal skill to have during your PSW career. By actively listening, you show your clients that you are engaged in what they are saying. You can indicate that you are actively listening by maintaining eye contact, acknowledging what the client is saying, and, once they are done speaking, responding in a way that directly addresses what they have just said.

Active listening helps build trust and comfort between yourself and clients. Furthermore, as you will learn during your personal support worker courses, PSWs respect the individuality of their clients by recognizing that each one has different needs. Through active listening you can better understand what those needs are so that you can respond to them effectively.

Interpersonal Skills Help PSWs Provide Support and Reassurance to Family

PSWs don’t just communicate with clients; they also communicate with their clients’ families. Indeed, families will understandably want to make sure that their loved one’s PSW is compassionate and trustworthy.

Your clients’ families will feel supported and reassured by your interpersonal skills

Your clients’ families will feel supported and reassured by your interpersonal skills

Furthermore, family members may turn to you to learn how they can help assist in the care needs of their loved one. It’s one of the reasons why the training provided in a personal support worker diploma program includes how to assist family members. With your interpersonal skills, you can more effectively communicate to them how they can provide such assistance, helping them feel empowered and supported.

Are you ready to take the first step towards a PSW career?

Contact National Academy of Health and Business to learn about our programs!

Promoting Healthy Coping Strategies with the Help of Personal Support Worker Training

2019-02-06 by NAHB

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Pursuing a career as a personal support worker is an incredibly rewarding endeavour. As a PSW, you’ll be providing care to the people who need it most. However, as with many professions in healthcare, the rewards of this career also come with certain challenges.

If you pursue a career as a personal support worker, you may at some point interact with families as they cope with difficult news. This is especially common if your client passes away or if they have recently received a discouraging diagnosis. As a PSW, navigating this grief can present challenges, especially since different families grieve in different ways.

To help you thrive in your career, here are some points to keep in mind as a PSW.

Personal Support Workers Can Show Empathy While Acknowledging Limitations

Providing empathetic support to families of seriously ill clients can be a balancing act. This is because you’ll need to show families that you are sympathetic to what they are going through without crossing any boundaries.

It’s usually best to avoid phrases such as “I know how you feel”. Even if you have a loved one who is ill, you can’t know what another person is feeling, and often this well-intentioned statement can backfire. Instead, it is often best to simply admit that you can’t imagine what they are going through.

Furthermore, while it’s normal to feel saddened when a client passes or when their illness progresses, it is important to remain composed and professional when communicating with the family. If you don’t, they may become uncomfortable or start to feel like they are the ones who need to support you. If you find an instance particularly difficult to manage, it may be best to have a colleague take your place temporarily.

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PSWs need to strike a balance between offering empathy while not overstepping boundaries

Use Personal Support Worker Training to Provide Families with Practical Assistance

Regardless of whether news was sudden or expected, many families may find it difficult to cope. For some individuals, this may be the first time they have dealt with such a situation. The practical support offered by graduates of personal support worker training can be especially valuable during this time. For example, if a client has received a difficult diagnosis or has lost mobility, the assistance you provide with things like personal hygiene and mealtimes can help them maintain a high quality of life. This in turn can reassure families that their loved ones are receiving the best care they can.

Personal Support Workers Can Take Their Cues from Grieving Families

Everybody grieves in their own way, which is something to be cognizant of in your profession after completing a personal support worker diploma. Some people will be very emotional, while others may appear the opposite. People going through grief often worry that they are not doing it the “right” way. As a PSW, you need to remain non-judgemental of how people grieve. Some may want to talk to you about their loved one, while others will want to be left alone. Again, there is no right or wrong way to grieve, so take your cues from the family when approaching these situations.

Are you interested in a career as a personal support worker?

Contact the National Academy of Health and Business to learn more about our personal support worker courses.

How to Keep Senior Clients Safe in the Winter When You Become a PSW

2018-12-05 by NAHB

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Keeping your clients safe is the most important part a personal support worker’s (PSW) job. Winter, with its cold, snow, and ice, can be treacherous for older clients, especially if they have reduced mobility.

In PSW training, you learn many skills that can help senior clients feel more secure and at ease. During the colder months, that training will be particularly useful. Here’s a look at just a few of the ways you can care for older clients in the winter.

PSWs Can Help Prevent Slips and Falls, Both Inside and Out

Sidewalks or driveways that have not been cleared of snow and ice are extremely dangerous. For young people, slipping on ice usually just means a couple bruises, but for older adults it can mean broken bones and worse. While PSWs may not be expected to clear their clients’ driveways and sidewalks themselves, PSW training, especially courses focused on caring for those with reduced mobility, includes valuable tools for reducing the risk of falls. As a PSW, you can talk to clients about what snow clearing services they have. If they don’t have somebody clearing their snow, ask them if they know anybody—like a friend or neighbour—who might be able to do it.

The threat from slips and falls doesn’t just exist outside during the winter. All that snow, ice, and slush gets tracked inside too, which makes interior surfaces very wet and slippery. To reduce the risk of falls inside, encourage your clients to wear slip-proof shoes or slippers.

Use Your Personal Support Worker Certificate to Ensure Your Client Eats Healthy

In personal support worker courses you learn about meal preparation and nutrition, which is a very important topic during the winter when most people stay inside more and make fewer trips to the grocery store. For senior clients, that can mean fewer items in their pantries and less nutritional variety. Make sure your clients have a well-stocked kitchen with a variety of healthy foods. Items that are high in Vitamin D are an especially good idea.

 

PSW training teaches you how to prepare nutritious meals for senior clients

PSW training teaches you how to prepare nutritious meals for senior clients

In the event of a power outage or during a bad storm, it may be difficult for your client to replenish their kitchen cupboards. Make sure they have at least a seven-day supply of non-perishable foods in case of such an emergency. If your client can’t make the trip to the grocery store themselves to stock up on food, encourage them to ask someone they know to do it for them. As you learn during a personal support worker certificate, each client has different needs. Some clients may be less comfortable asking friends or family for help with getting groceries. In many cases, those clients don’t want to sacrifice their independence or they are worried about “being a bother.”

Make Sure They Are Always Warm Enough

Seniors are at an increased risk of hypothermia in the winter, which happens when the body’s core temperature dips below 35⁰C. PSWs learn how to recognize potential medical emergencies like hypothermia in older clients. Certain clients will be especially vulnerable to the cold, such as those with cardiac problems.

 

PSWs can help senior clients learn how to keep warm in the winter

PSWs can help senior clients learn how to keep warm in the winter

While space heaters can help senior clients stay warm during the winter, they can be dangerous if not used properly. Make sure clients use any heating devices safely, such as by keeping them far away from drapes, curtains, and anything else that could catch fire. Double-check that fire and carbon monoxide alarms are working. The interpersonal skills you develop during PSW training are invaluable for helping clients understand the risks of cold weather. Ask them if they have lots of extra blankets and if they know anyone who can check in on them when you can’t be there.

Are you interested in how to become a PSW?

Check out the National Academy of Health and Business’ programs today!

How to Conquer Compassion Fatigue after You Become a PSW

2018-11-14 by NAHB

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Compassion fatigue, sometimes known as secondary traumatic stress, is a unique form of burnout that can affect personal support workers (PSWs) and others who work in a caregiving capacity, such as doctors, nurses, or paramedics. These professionals are in regular contact with individuals experiencing traumatic pain or injuries, and in the course of providing practical support, they also provide compassion and empathy, invaluable forms of emotional support. This can be incredibly rewarding for caregivers, who get the satisfaction of making tangible improvements to the lives of those in need, but over time, it can also become draining or desensitizing, making caregivers feel hopeless, numb, or distant to the pain of others.

Working With Clients Who Have Parkinson’s After PSW College

2018-06-27 by NAHB

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Parkinson’s is a neurodegenerative disease that affects many Canadians over the age of 60. In fact, according to the most recent figures, as many as 100,000 Canadians are currently living with Parkinson’s.

Symptoms can range from extreme stiffness of the muscles and joints to shaking, making it difficult for clients to maintain their balance and complete daily activities. Clients may even begin to have difficulties speaking or swallowing, and may start to experience depression. These symptoms often become worse with time, which can be challenging for both the client and their family.

Thankfully, there are several ways that personal support workers (PSWs) can help their clients feel comfortable, healthy, and happy while receiving care. Read on to learn more!

PSWs Should Be Mindful of Any Changes in Their Client’s Mood or Symptoms

Parkinson’s comes with a plethora of symptoms, both before and after the diagnosis, and it is important for trained PSWs to keep close watch for any changes. The symptoms of Parkinson’s will usually progress in stages, from 1-5, and significantly affect a client’s ability to move normally. In fact, many clients may become wheelchair bound in the fifth stage of the disease. Clients will usually take medication to help stave off the effects of the disease. However, if a client’s symptoms—such as a signs of mental decline or an inability to swallow—begin to worsen it’s important for PSWs to inform their supervisors as the client may need to change their medication.

Depression can develop alongside other Parkinson’s symptoms

Depression can develop alongside other Parkinson’s symptoms

Graduates of PSW college should also be wary of any changes in their client’s overall mood, as they may become more irritable and anxious, and may be prone to outbursts. Moreover, about 40 per cent of Parkinson’s patients may end up developing depression at some point, and could require additional medication or counselling in order to cope. PSWs will need to be patient with their clients who have Parkinson’s and show empathy, as a calm and compassionate attitude can ensure that the care they receive is positive and professional.

Grads of PSW Courses Should Ensure Their Clients Get the Exercise They Need

Exercise can be very beneficial for seniors with Parkinson’s, as it can help with pain relief and might assist some clients with improving their balance. Parkinson’s clients may often need the expertise of a physiotherapist to develop some routines that graduates of PSW courses can later assist with.

Some excellent exercises for Parkinson’s clients could be simple things like walking or swinging their arms. They could even play non-strenuous sports like mini-golf or ping pong to work their arms, hips, and wrists. More complex exercises could include Thai Chi and Yoga, both of which can be modified for clients to perform while seated.

PSWs can also help clients with stretching exercises which can improve their posture, as well as strengthen their bones and muscles. Stretching exercises have even been shown to help those with Parkinson’s quicken their speed when walking. PSWs should be cautious when assisting clients with their exercises, making sure that they don’t injure or overextend themselves. PSWs should also be ready to support clients who have difficulty moving certain parts of their body, and safeguard them from falls.

PSWs Should Make Sure Their Clients Get Plenty of Rest

Another important factor that can contribute to the overall wellbeing of clients with Parkinson’s is sleep. Unfortunately, many people with Parkinson’s may end up developing sleep problems, like insomnia or sleep apnea, and some seniors may need up to 30 minutes to fall asleep. A lack of sleep has also been shown to make the symptoms of Parkinson’s worse.

In some cases, clients with Parkinson’s may be prescribed medication from their doctors. PSWs can also help their clients by doing simple things like observing bedtime routines. PSWs may also want to limit sources of noise that could disturb the sleep of their clients. Small gestures like closing windows and reducing the amount of light in the room can help clients sleep better and enjoy a greater quality of life.

Get PSW training and help improve the quality of life for clients with Parkinson’s!

Get PSW training and help improve the quality of life for clients with Parkinson’s!

Are you ready to start a rewarding healthcare career where you can help clients in your community?

Contact the National Academy of Health and Business and become a PSW.

Healthy Blood Pressure: Helping Your Clients Address Hypertension During Your PSW Career

2018-05-02 by NAHB

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Unhealthy habits are difficult to turn around, especially if they’re already having an impact on physical wellbeing. Exercise and a good diet are important for people of all ages, and a personal support worker (PSW) knows the importance of those habits, especially later on in a client’s life. When it comes to managing hypertension (high blood pressure), lifestyle changes can make a big difference.

It’s estimated that one out of every five Canadians lives with hypertension, and it’s particularly common among older adults. It’s regarded as a silent killer because it has no symptoms, but high blood pressure can eventually lead to serious conditions like heart attack, stroke, or coronary artery disease. May is Hypertension Awareness Month, so it’s the perfect time to take on board some tips to address this health problem.

Blood Pressure Readings Should Be Carried Out Regularly

Home blood pressure monitors are quite common, and regularly taking measurements can be a good idea. The cuffs with this equipment should be appropriately sized for the client to ensure that an accurate reading is taken.

A healthy blood pressure range is usually seen as 120/80. The first figure refers to Systolic Pressure—the pressure in arteries when the heart beats. The second figure measures Diastolic Pressure—the pressure in arteries between heartbeats. Both figures record in millimeters of mercury and higher figures mean increased blood pressure levels.

Clients should avoid food, exercise, caffeine, or smoking for one hour before blood pressure readings are taken in both arms. That’s because these activities could lead to an inaccurate reading where problems are left unidentified.

Grads of Personal Support Worker Courses Can Help Clients With Diet and Exercise

The diet needed to combat high blood pressure follows an almost identical pattern to a regular healthy diet. DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) is seen as a helpful guide, and it seeks to limit the consumption of saturated and total fats like dairy and meat products. Salt also contributes to high blood pressure. As you assist your clients during mealtimes throughout your PSW career, you should be mindful about this and limit the amount of salt included in meals.

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A healthy diet can make all the difference for clients with hypertension

Potassium, magnesium, and calcium are seen as the three key elements of a healthy diet aimed at reducing hypertension. These elements are more prevalent in vegetarian diets, so fruit and vegetables should be increased in your client’s diet. Low-fat dairy products—which are a terrific source of calcium—are also promoted as well as brown rice, potatoes, and tomatoes—which are high in magnesium.

Maintaining a healthy weight lowers blood pressure, so exercise should be encouraged too. For older clients, this could mean walking a bit more during the day or participating in an age-appropriate exercise class. Chair exercises are a great form of exercise for people who have difficulty with mobility, and can easily be worked into a daily routine.

Making Sure That Clients Take Blood Pressure Medication at the Right Times

Dietary and lifestyle change may not be enough to adequately reduce hypertension levels. For some clients, their doctor may have had to prescribe medication. There are three main groups of blood pressure medication. Thiazidediuretics target the kidneys by eliminating salt and water, Beta Blockers slow down the heartbeat, while ACE inhibitors ease pressure by opening up blood vessels. Professionals with a personal support worker certificate know it’s important to follow the doctor’s advice and ensure clients are taking their medication at the right time.

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Help your clients take their medications regularly

Dietary supplements may also be seen as an easier way to achieve a balanced diet. If a doctor has recommended these as well, ensuring that clients regularly take them will help to improve their health and prevent further problems form arising.

Personal support worker courses are the first step on the path to a range of rewarding careers.

Check out what’s on offer at the National Academy of Health and Business!

Helping Seniors Feel Less Isolated: How You Can Make a Difference During Your PSW Career

2018-04-11 by NAHB

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Isolation is real problem that affects 28 per cent of seniors aged 65 and older, most living alone without a spouse or family member. Seniors often become isolated because of uncontrollable external factors, such as disability, the death of a family member, or retirement. Studies have shown that social isolation among seniors can increase the risk of death, poor physical and mental health, and impaired mobility. Isolated seniors are also at a higher risk of being the victims of elder abuse as well as long-term illnesses such as depression, dementia, chronic lung disease, and arthritis.

Thankfully, there is a way for compassionate individuals to contribute to ending isolation among seniors, and enhancing the quality of their care. Students pursuing a career as a Personal Support Worker (PSW) can reduce feelings of isolation, helping their clients feel included as valued members of their communities.

Here are some of the ways a career as a PSW can help you prevent isolation among seniors.

PSW Training Can Teach You How to Address the Individual Needs of Each Client

Being able to assess and adapt your care to the needs of each individual client will be an important part of your PSW career. For example, clients who experience anxiety or depression may require more mental stimulation or encouragement to join in a group activity. Some may even benefit from having a pet, or from regular visits by therapy animals.

Being able to properly attend to each client’s unique requirements can make all the difference. It’s why top schools like the National Academy of Health and Business (NAHB) include courses dedicated to the individuality of the patient. Throughout your career, your ability to help each client in the way that best addresses their unique challenges and concerns can help them break free from feelings of isolation.

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Knowing each client’s specific needs can help PSWs enhance care

PSW Training Also Prepares You to Meet the Specific Safety Needs of Clients

Another important issue for many seniors suffering from isolation is safety. Isolated seniors may have more difficulty maintaining an adequate diet or getting enough physical activity. For some, vision loss can also make them more prone to tripping and other accidents. This can present a dangerous problem. Seniors may experience a fall or other safety problem, which can have serious consequences on their health. In addition, an accident can further isolate a senior, as it can reduce their mobility and make it more difficult for them to leave the house or engage in activities.

Fortunately, professionals with PSW training have a clear, complete, and grounded understanding of safety standards, such as general techniques for assisting a senior with their mobility, medication assistance, and CPR/ first aide. Each of these skills can help you ensure that your clients stay safe, even when they may have a smaller support network of friends and family to rely on.

PSWs Can Help Seniors Just by Being There

For many seniors, a visit from their PSW can be the highlight of their day. A friendly, compassionate, and engaged PSW can create a social environment that keeps seniors feeling connected to those around them. Asking a client about their day, remembering their hobbies and interests, and enjoying friendly conversations together can all help to build connection and reduce isolation.

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A friendly and compassionate PSW can have a positive impact

For this reason, communication is an essential skill students learn to develop during their training. For example, at NAHB students learn to develop their interpersonal skills, and even get to practice these skills in a real work setting through practical placements. As a result, students graduate knowing how to best connect with their clients. For many, it can be one of the most rewarding aspects of this career path.

Are you ready to contribute to enhancing the quality of care for seniors?

Earn your certification by enrolling in personal support worker courses at the National Academy of Health and Business!

The Answers to Common Interview Questions You Might Hear After Your PSW Courses

2018-01-24 by NAHB

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Job interviews can feel a bit stressful, especially when it’s for a position you’ve always wanted. Fortunately, preparing ahead of time can lessen those fluttering nerves. One of the best ways to prepare is to do some research on questions that might come up during the interview. This way you have the chance to pre-formulate answers to some of the questions that you may be asked.

Some questions—like “what are your strengths and weaknesses”—come up in most job interviews, whether you’re applying to work as a personal support worker (PSW) or not. However, as you begin your career as a PSW, you might encounter a few other common career-specific interview questions often asked by employers. Here are some of the questions you might hear, as well as a few standard interview prep tips you should never forget.

Scenario-Based Questions Are Frequently Asked During Interviews for PSW Positions

The most common interview questions often asked when applying for PSW positions are scenario-based ones. This means that you are asked about how you might apply your skills and knowledge to a specific situation, or how you may have done so in the past.

Scenario-based questions help employers know how you would approach different responsibilities

Scenario-based questions help employers know how you would approach different responsibilities

An example of a scenario-based question is how you might care for a palliative client. Another scenario-based question you could be asked is what you might do if a client falls. Remembering the training you completed when earning your personal support worker diploma will help you answer these kinds of questions. You can provide an example of a time when you encountered this type of situation during your community placement or arranged long-term care placement, or discuss how the courses you completed in Palliative Care, Assisting the Family/Coping Mechanisms, and more helped equip you with the skills to handle these scenarios. Demonstrating how your training has prepared you for many different situations will show employers that you are ready for the challenges of this role.

Questions About Dealing With a Difficult Situations in Your Personal Support Worker Career

A common set of scenario-based questions aspiring PSWs often encounter are those asking how you may deal with aggressiveness and other difficult situations during your personal support worker career. Aggressiveness, frustration, and anger can sometimes come from a resident, their family members, of even a stressed co-worker. While these negative situations might not be a common occurrence, they could happen from time to time throughout your career.

A client might feel scared and frustrated about a medical condition they have, or family might have difficulty processing what their loved one is going through. Sometimes, aggressiveness can be a symptom of a medical condition such as dementia. Often in these circumstances, your ability to remain calm and professional can help diffuse the situation. Knowing that a caring professional is listening to them and taking their concerns seriously can go a long way towards soothing a stressed client or family member.

By telling employers how you would address these types of situations, and by providing examples of how you have remained professional in the past, you can demonstrate that you would be a valuable member of the team.

There Are a Number of Things You Should Not Forget Prior to Any Interview

No matter what position you may be interviewing for, there are a number of things you should always do—before, during, and after your interview. Prepare for the interview in advance not only by reviewing and answering possible questions, but also by figuring out how long it will take you to get there and what you want to wear for the interview. This way, you won’t have to worry about running late or forgetting something important. During the interview you should also maintain eye contact, smile, and take your time to answer questions without rushing in. Also feel free to ask questions to the interviewer as well, which can help demonstrate your interest in the position and the organization. By keeping these points in mind, you’ll be able to shine during your job search after graduation.

Are you looking to change lives by becoming a personal support worker?

Explore the PSW courses offered by NAHB!

Essential Qualities Students Need to Succeed in Personal Support Worker Courses

2017-12-20 by Isabelle Schumacher

A Key Part of All Personal Support Worker Courses

Going back to school can be an intimidating experience, especially after years in the real world. Many students worry that their study skills might be a little rusty, or that balancing a busy schedule with school work will be too difficult to do. Fortunately, top personal support worker (PSW) programs are there to help students every step of the way. Whether by providing students with helpful support in finding financing options, or even assisting them in landing their dream job after graduation, our dedicated staff are there to help students launch their PSW careers. The expert instructors at National Academy of Health and Business (NAHB) also care deeply about the success of their students, and will happily answer any questions you might have throughout your studies.

In addition, there are also plenty of qualities that you might already possess which can be a true asset, both in the classroom and during your career. What are they? Read on to find out!

Compassion: A Key Part of All Personal Support Worker Courses

If you’re considering a career as a personal support worker, there’s a good chance that you care deeply about the wellbeing of others. Maybe you love to help others, or want to make a positive difference in your community. Perhaps you’ve been a caregiver for a loved one, and want to make sure that others get much-deserved attention as well.

Whatever reason you have for becoming interested in personal support worker training, your compassion will be an important key to your success both during your training and in your career. Whether helping a senior enjoy a tasty meal, or making sure a client with a disability is assisted with activities like personal hygiene, your compassion will shine through to all around you.

Attention to Detail: An Important Component to Any PSW Career

As you begin your different personal support worker courses, you’ll soon learn that attention to detail is an important part of this career path. That’s because each client under your care will be a unique individual with their own personality and medical history. Top personal support workers know to pay attention to key details and personalize the care each client receives. In fact, PSW programs like the one offered at NAHB even include an entire module on the individuality of the patient, so that students graduate ready to provide top-quality care. Your ability to notice details about clients will help you stand out during your classes, as well as in your long-term care and community placements.

PSWs work hard to personalize care for each client

PSWs work hard to personalize care for each client

Strength: An Essential Quality Found in All Personal Support Workers

Strength can come in many different shapes and sizes. It could be the physical strength to assist a client get in and out of bed safely. It can also be the strength to help clients and their families as they go through a very difficult time.

Many clients in long term care might be living with health problems, dementia, or other illnesses. For both the client and their family, this can be a difficult time. Palliative care, as well as coping mechanisms and tools for helping families, are included in PSW programs for this very reason. For many students returning to their studies, the life experience and personal strength they have developed are true assets. As you begin your studies, you’ll soon discover that your strength, combined with your compassion and attention to detail, will help you excel in your courses and truly make a difference in the lives of others.

The strength and compassion of PSWs makes a world of difference for their clients

The strength and compassion of PSWs makes a world of difference for their clients

Are you ready to earn your personal support worker certificate?

Contact National Academy of Health and Business to get started!

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