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Careers in Supply Chain and Logistics

July 16, 2014

CAREERS IN SUPPLY CHAIN AND LOGISTICS

In Canada, the supply chain sector is currently on an upward trajectory. The market is experiencing growth, and experts predict that there will be employment opportunities in this field in the coming years. Professionals who possess supply chain and logistics training can help companies manage goods around the world through acquisition, storage, inventory management and more. Training in this field will teach you skills like:

  • Forecasting & Purchasing
  • Evaluating Cost & Quality of Goods
  • Inventory Management
  • Contract Negotiations
  • Freight Forwarding
  • International Trade & Customs
  • Project Management
  • Technology in Supply Chain
  • Customer Service

And much more. If you’re looking a career that’s satisfying, challenging, fast-paced and well-remunerated, the supply chain sector could be just what you need. It will make good use of your logistic, planning and coordination skills, and you’ll get to join a dynamic industry that’s constantly evolving. There are literally hundreds of career paths in this sector, but here are a few of our favourites.

Operations Manager

The Operation Manager plans, controls and directs the operations of a manufacturing establishment or distribution centre. They ensure that strategic operational plans are properly implemented and evaluate performance by reviewing data related to current stock, expected arrivals and more. The operations manager often works with numbers, but also with clients and other managers, meaning he or she must be a good communicator able to coordinate with others. Leadership skills and good judgement are also important for this type of position.

Inventory Auditor

Inventory Auditors ensure the quality, accuracy and quantity of the physical inventory. When a shipment arrives, for example, they must evaluate its content to make sure nothing is missing, damaged or mislabelled. Moreover, they are also responsible for auditing and correcting internal inventory issues, such as, for example, when an item is missing. To be efficient as an inventory auditor, you must be vigilant and able to concentrate on your task without getting distracted. Though inventory auditing can sound simple, it’s actually a very important role within the supply chain industry.

Warehouse Manager

A warehouse manager is responsible for an entire warehouse of stock. This means he or she must plan and direct the activities of the warehouse workers to ensure that the daily operations run on time. A warehouse, and by extension its manager, can be tasked with receiving, shipping or sorting out stock, assisting with an inventory audit and more. Lastly, the warehouse manager must be well-organized and a good team worker, as many of his or her duties will involve communicating and collaborating with others.

Procurement Clerk

The procurement clerk is responsible for contacting suppliers to schedule deliveries and to resolve shortages, missed deliveries or any other problems that can occur. They work with numbers and logistics and often have to review requisition orders, process purchases, calculate costs and forward invoices to the appropriate accounts. Over time, some procurement clerks choose to pursue additional training, such as payroll training or accounting courses, to continue advancing in their careers.

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